Poynter News University: Language of the Image

After completing the Poynter News University course, Language of the Image, I have a new found appreciation for the power of images to tell a story.  The lesson was essentially an interactive vocabulary lesson.  It taught me about all the different aspects of photographs that make the good ones great.

In photojournalism, the goal is to convey the message of a story in a way that both informs and entertains readers.  This is done best when a photographer uses the tools of photography and composition.  By giving a picture a certain mood, an obvious, eye-catching point of focus, or by using juxtaposition, photographs can help people look at the world in a way they never thought of before.

This lesson taught me that there is a difference between the ways words are able to communicate a story and the ways images allow people to go deeper into a story. After going through the lesson, I felt that I had a much better understanding about photography in general.

Photo galleries are a new way that news outlets are able to tell stories.  An interesting example is the story of Minnesota Gophers coach, Tim Brewster.  Brewster was fired this weekend and the entire story was chronicled by a photo gallery on the Star Tribune’s website.

The photographs in this gallery are able to tell an interesting story, which gives the reader an ample amount of information, with only captions and pictures.  A good picture can not only tell an important story, but shape our culture’s perception of the present and the past.

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About Bob Ringer

I am a 21-year-old journalist and student at Minnesota State University, Mankato,born and raised in the shadow of the Twin Cities, in the suburb of Bloomington, Minnesota.
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